Double Trouble

Double Trouble

Double Trouble
When sports injuries threatened to slow down the Phelps twins, they found the help they needed to stay on track at Saint Joseph London, part of KentuckyOne Health.

The 16-year-old sophomores, Madison and Payton Phelps, attend Southwestern High School in Somerset and are active in their school’s athletic program. Unfortunately, they have both had personal experiences with one of the greatest downsides of playing sports — injuries. But, with the help of Jay Shah, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at Saint Joseph London, the Phelps twins are working toward an exceptional comeback.

Madison: A Scrimmage Misstep

A wrong step during a basketball scrimmage left Madison in agony. It only took a moment, but the intense pain in her knee told her that something was seriously wrong.

After visiting her primary care physician, who ordered an X-ray and MRI, Madison was diagnosed with a strained anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). When her pain continued despite physical therapy, Madison’s doctor recommended she see Dr. Shah for a second opinion.

Dr. Shah diagnosed Madison with a 70 percent ACL tear and advised her that surgery would be the best way to free her from pain. Shortly after, Dr. Shah performed corrective surgery, and Madison’s real recovery began.

“After surgery, Dr. Shah called to check on me multiple times,” Madison said. “He asked if I had any questions and made me feel comfortable about the process. I saw him for follow-up appointments, and he kept up with my progress from physical therapy until I was completely healed.”

Madison has been cleared to continue playing basketball.

Payton: A Tricky Catch

About a year after Madison’s knee injury, her brother, Payton, injured his finger while catching a football. At first, the family thought it was jammed and would heal with time. However, the swelling and pain continued getting worse.

A visit to his primary care provider revealed that Payton’s finger was broken and would require surgery. The Phelps family knew exactly who to turn to.

“We emailed Dr. Shah on a holiday about Payton’s finger, expecting him to respond the next day, and he replied within 10 minutes,” said Paula Phelps, the twins’ mother. “The next day, Dr. Shah saw Payton and did his surgery. It was great to feel that personal connection.”

Payton’s surgery was successful and Dr. Shah is optimistic that his finger will continue to heal.

This story originally appeared in the 2017 Spring edition of One Health magazine. For more stories like this one, subscribe to One Health today.