Expanding Transplant Care

Expanding Transplant Care Thanks to $5.3 Million in Funding

Trager Transplant Center

One of the leading providers of organ transplantation in the country has a new home.

The Trager Transplant Center in downtown Louisville provides world-class transplantation services to Kentucky and the surrounding states. Overwhelming success in such a short time has taken the center from Jewish Hospital to the newly renovated third floor of the Frazier Rehab Institute — a space nearly twice the size.

The Trager Center is recognized as being one of the first in Kentucky to perform adult heart, pancreas and liver transplants. It’s also capable of implanting the latest technology — such as the ventricular assist device — to act as a transplant alternative.

The Trager Transplant Center ribbon cutting ceremony

Pictured: Leslie Buddeke Smart CFRE, division vice president, development; Kelly McMasters MD, chairman of the U of L department of surgery; Mark Slaughter MD, executive director of cardiovascular services for the KentuckyOne Health Louisville Market, chair of the department of cardiovascular and thoracic surgery at the University of Louisville; Amy Trager; Jean Trager; Steve Trager; Michael Trager and Andrew Trager.

“We’ve certainly established a reputation in the region for high-quality care and incredible patient experiences,” said Joe Gilene, market president for the KentuckyOne Health downtown Louisville campus. “Many years of exceptional work, support from the Foundation and a generous gift from Jean and Bernard Trager in honor of their children and grandchildren have allowed us to expand our space to meet the rising demand.”

With the first procedure completed on Aug. 1, the new venue has already revealed numerous benefits, including:

  • Increased volume, thanks to expanding from six to 16 exam rooms
  • More comfort for patients and their families within a brighter area
  • Improved communication with four new consultation rooms
  • Updated education rooms to help answer patient questions and concerns
  • Additional space for on-site administrative and physician offices

“Our volume has greatly increased even from just two years ago,” said David Lewis, director of transplant services at KentuckyOne Health. “The new space allows us to take in more patients and, ultimately, save more lives.”

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2016 edition of One Health Magazine