Sweet Potato Casserole [Recipe]

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

Looking for a healthier version of a holiday favorite? 

“This recipe is my favorite because no one even knows that it is a ‘healthy’ dish,” says Janelle M. Schnake, certified diabetes educator for KentuckyOne Health. “The Greek yogurt adds a bit of texture and flavor everyone loves.”

Try this recipe for a flavorful Sweet Potato Casserole that your family will be sure to enjoy!

Ingredients

 

3 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
1 cup vanilla Greek yogurt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 pinch (1/8 teaspoon) nutmeg
1 pinch (1/8 teaspoon) salt
1 tablespoon brown sugar
4 large egg whites OR 2 large whole eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease or spray a 2.5-quart casserole dish.

Put the sweet potatoes in a medium sauce pan with enough water to cover them. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce to a simmer and cook until fork-tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Drain.

Return the sweet potatoes to the pot and use a potato masher to mash them up (or transfer them to the bowl of a stand mixer and beat them lightly).

Add the yogurt, cinnamon, nutmeg, brown sugar and salt. Beat for 30 seconds. Add the eggs and beat them in.

Transfer the mixture to the lightly greased or sprayed casserole dish.

Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, but keep the temperature on 350; top evenly with the pecans and place back in the oven. Cook until they are lightly browned, about 10 to 15 minutes.

Nutritional Information

 

Servings: 6 | Each serving contains:
251 calories
9 grams fat
36 grams carbohydrates
9 grams protein

When Wounds Won’t Go Away

When Wounds Won't Go Away

When Wounds Won't Go Away

Diabetes and poor blood flow can turn minor cuts and sores into major problems. KentuckyOne Health wound care centers have the expertise and advanced treatments to heal them.

Chronic wounds can occur anywhere on the body, but two of the most common locations are the legs and feet.

“Venous or arterial insufficiency can lead to blood flow or swelling complications, and in turn, cause ulcers on the legs or feet,” said Tina Hasty, BSN, CWCA, clinical program director at Saint Joseph Hospital Wound Care and Hyperbaric Oxygen Center, part of KentuckyOne Health. “Individuals who have diabetes may not notice a small wound on the bottom of the foot because the disease can cause nerve damage. Over time, these wounds may grow bigger without their knowledge, unless they check their feet regularly.”

Approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes develop foot ulcers (open sores or wounds). This happens because healing is typically slower for those with diabetes.

“High levels of blood glucose can negatively impact one’s blood circulation and nervous system, which ultimately affects the body’s ability to heal,” said Timothy Ford, DPM, podiatric physician and surgeon. “It is very important for patients with diabetes to take care of their feet and look for any wounds. If not treated properly, wounds could lead to amputation.”

A Two-pronged Approach

If you have a wound that hasn’t healed in 30 days, you should visit a wound care center, where specially trained physicians and nurses can treat the wound and ensure you receive care for its underlying causes. KentuckyOne Health has three wound care centers, which are located in Bardstown, Louisville and Lexington.

“Our wound care team develops treatment plans for patients and as indicated, refers them to specialists, including vascular surgeons, infectious disease specialists and podiatrists,” Hasty said. “We have a variety of treatments we can use to heal wounds, including advanced dressings, compression therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Educating patients about their wounds is also an important part of our work.”

Have a wound that won’t heal? Learn more about treatments and find the wound care center nearest you.

This article originally appeared in the 2017 Summer edition of One Health Magazine. Sign up for your free subscription.

Get Hands-on About Your Health

Get Hands-on About Your Health

Get Hands-on About Your Health
Preventive screenings help you understand your state of health.

Health screenings look for the risk or presence of a wide variety of conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer, to name a few. When done regularly, screenings can help pinpoint many problems early, when they may be corrected with lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet, exercising or taking medication.

Having the right screenings at the right time is vital.

Let’s Talk About It

 

“When — or even if — you need certain screenings depends on many factors, including your age, family history and other medical issues you may be living with,” said Ron Waldridge II, MD, physician executive at KentuckyOne Health Medical Group and family practice physician with KentuckyOne Health Primary Care Associates. “It’s best to have a relationship with a primary care doctor who can help you make smart screening decisions.”

Use your annual wellness visit as an opportunity to talk with your primary care doctor about screenings and check in regularly about any other medical concerns that may arise. Together, you and your doctor can design a wellness plan that uses screenings and preventive measures to help you stay healthier, longer.

Speak with your primary care physician to learn more about each type of health screening.

Looking for Lung Cancer

 

Statistically, cancer occurs more frequently in Kentucky than anywhere else in the U.S., and lung cancer in particular is a serious health concern in the Commonwealth.

“Hearing you have cancer is devastating,” said Hilary Deskins, RN, manager of cancer prevention services with KentuckyOne Health. “Our lung cancer screening program helps us diagnose this potentially deadly disease early. That’s important, because catching it early saves lives. According to the Lung Cancer Alliance, ours is the largest screening program in the United States.”

A lung cancer screening is done using a low-dose computed tomography (CT) scan.

Patients qualify for the screening who:

  • Are ages 55 to 80
  • Have a 30-pack-year smoking history (the equivalent of smoking one pack of cigarettes per day for 30 years)
  • Haven’t had a chest CT scan in the last year
  • Don’t already have symptoms of lung cancer
  • Still smoke or quit within the last 15 years

This article originally appeared in the 2017 Spring edition of One Health magazine. To receive more wellness news and information, subscribe today

Losing Weight for a Healthier Life

Losing Weight for a Healthier Life

Losing Weight for a Healthier Life

Did you know weight-loss surgery can help treat Type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes can be challenging to control. Adults with the condition must prick their fingers to check their blood sugar multiple times a day. Many also take one or more medications or use insulin injections to keep their glucose levels under control. Even with these treatments, some people have a difficult time managing their illness.

“Medications and insulin injections work to a point, but they’re like a bandage,” said Robert Farrell, MD, FACS, bariatric surgeon at KentuckyOne Health Weight Loss and Surgery Associates. “We’re now seeing a paradigm shift. Weight-loss surgery is becoming a prominent choice for some people with Type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese.”

Available Options

Three weight-loss surgeries — Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding — were discussed at the 2nd Diabetes Surgery Summit as treatment options for Type 2 diabetes. All three are available at KentuckyOne Health and are performed laparoscopically, meaning surgeons operate through several small, key-hole-sized incisions instead of through one large incision. Laparoscopic surgery is usually less painful and gets patients back on their feet faster.

During a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, surgeons create a small pouch from a portion of the stomach. This pouch is separated from the rest of the stomach and the two upper parts of the small intestine, which are known as the duodenum and jejunum. The pouch is then reconnected to the lower segment of the small intestine, forming a “Y” shape. The surgery limits the amount of food people can comfortably eat at one time and the number of calories and nutrients that are absorbed from food.

“Metabolic changes happen almost instantly when you bypass the duodenum, so people see diabetes improvement not long after surgery,” said Joshua Steiner, MD, FACS, bariatric surgeon at the Center for Weight Loss Surgery at Saint Joseph East, part of KentuckyOne Health. “Many of our patients go home needing very little of their diabetes medication.”

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimates that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass essentially cures Type 2 diabetes in 80 percent of cases. Roughly 85 to 90 percent of Dr. Steiner’s patients no longer have to worry about diabetes after surgery, and nearly 100 percent see improvement.
Dr. Farrell offers Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy, which was the most performed bariatric surgery in 2015, to patients looking to improve their Type 2 diabetes symptoms. During a sleeve gastrectomy, physicians remove roughly 80 to 85 percent of the stomach. More than 80 percent of his patients who have a sleeve gastrectomy notice Type 2 diabetes improvement or resolution.

“To see that there is an option that can treat diabetes and prevent serious complications fills people with hope,” Dr. Farrell said. “These surgeries are truly life changing.”

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2016 edition of One Health magazine. For more information about weight loss and nutrition, subscribe to One Health magazine today.