KentuckyOne Health hosts upcoming health fairs

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Jewish Hospital Shelbyville Hosts 18th Annual Men’s Health Fair on June 2

Shelbyville, Ky. (May 11, 2018) – Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, part of KentuckyOne Health, will hold its 18th annual Men’s Health Fair on Saturday, June 2, 2018.

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Saint Joseph London Hosts 17th Annual Maternity Fair

London, Ky. (May 17, 2018) — Saint Joseph London, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host its 17th annual Maternity Fair on Friday, June 1 from 5:30-8:30 p.m.

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Working your body for a better you

Working your body for a better you

Eat less. Move more. You might have heard this or seen this written at your doctor’s office. It does sound like a simple prescription for wellness, right? But we all know it’s easier said than done.

Busy lifestyles keep us from stopping at the gym, playing sports or even walking around the neighborhood. But research is telling us fitness activities are more important than ever for physical, mental and even emotional wellness. Making them a priority is possible with a little planning and thought.

Regular physical activity increases your chances of living a longer, healthier life. For children and adolescents, it improves muscular fitness, bone health and heart health. For adults it can help with sleep, lower the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. Being active also helps with emotional and mental health, by helping to manage depression and anxiety.

Here are some ways you can make “moving more” a fun part of your life.

For families:

  • Consider making a charity 5K walk part of your family’s next holiday or summer plans before heading for the cookout or family meal. Everyone can participate at their own pace without pressure and get some steps in while having fun.
  • While your child plays soccer or basketball, don’t pick up that cell phone and scroll Facebook. Use that time for a mini-workout by walking the perimeter of the field or court during practices or games.
  • Explore the outdoors by visiting a state park or hiking area. Most offer trails of varying lengths and family-friendly options. To make it more fun for kids, let them participate in picking the location or trail.
  • Make it a new habit to go for a group bike ride or dog-walking after dinner.

Just for you:

  • Finding an exercise buddy increases your chances of showing up for regular exercise, whether it’s at the gym or walking in the park or your own neighborhood. Having someone to chat with while you walk or work out makes it a social outing as well.
  • You’re not too old to play sports. Dust off your racket and join a tennis league or sign up for a volleyball team. You don’t have to be good; just have fun moving your body.
  • Instead of meeting a friend for dinner or drinks, meet at the park for a catchup session. Dinner can wait for a bit.
  • Replace a coffee or lunch break with an outdoor walk or walk a few flights of stairs to get your heart pumping.
  • Swim at your local recreation center. Instead of just sunbathing or watching the kids play, walk the length of the pool in the shallow end back and forth a few times for a light resistance workout.

Ways to be active are only limited by your imagination. Health benefits abound for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities, but be sure to consult your doctor if you haven’t been active in a while. Start slowly and build up.

A common mistake some people make is to take an all-or-none approach and fail by putting too much pressure on themselves. Don’t try to work out five days a week if you are just starting or getting back into physical activity; you’ll burn out or get injured. Remember, even a little activity is better than none.

With just little changes in your lifestyle and attitude, you can reap big health benefits from being active. If you think about it, you have nothing to lose, and everything to gain.

Looking for a great family-friendly event that gets you moving and also helps you give back to your local community? Sign up for the Yes, Mamm! 5K. Learn more about the race and then register today!

A few goals to help keep your weight loss on track

A few goals to help keep your weight loss on track

Are you considering or have you undergone weight loss surgery? If so, then it’s likely you’ve thought about personal milestones or goals you would like to achieve on your journey to living a healthier you.

During our bariatric support groups, we often talk about realistic goals and tips as we cheer each other on during this life changing experience. Below are a few goals that will have you thinking beyond the number on the scale and directly impact your health!

Eat Enough Protein

When it comes to your diet, Rule #1 is “eating enough protein.” Eating a diet rich in protein can help reduce hunger, improve your immune system and build strength. Your provider or dietitian can work with you to determine how much protein you should consume daily. Even if your bariatric surgery is long behind you, it’s a good idea to be aware of your protein intake to be sure you’re reaching your daily goal.

Drink More Fluids

Lose more weight, stay fuller and prevent dehydration fatigue and headaches by getting enough fluids. The goal for most adults is to drink at least 64 ounces of water, or rather fluids, each day. If you find yourself struggling to reach this goal, here are a few tips:

  • Create a visual reminder of how close you are to reaching your daily goal by filling up four, 16-ounce water bottles (or a 64-ounce pitcher) and make sure you finish them by the end of the day.
  • Get high-tech and set up a hydration reminder that syncs to your smartphone.
  • If plain water is too boring, try adding lemon or mint for a little flavor without the added sugar. Low-calorie flavored water, decaf tea and coffee can also be good choices when it comes to reaching your 64-ounces-a-day goal.

Find a Friend

Make it one of your goals to not go it alone. A friend can provide that extra encouragement and motivation that we all need some days. If one friend is good, more friends are better – the more the merrier when it comes to finding help and support with eating right, exercising and reducing stress.

Go to the Doctor

If you are considering weight loss surgery, it’s easy to see why going to a doctor is necessary. But you shouldn’t only be scheduling an appointment with your surgeon. Whether pre-op or post-op, seeing your primary care provider and any other of your regular doctors can help you get healthy and stay healthy. By routinely going to your doctor, you can actively monitor important health and wellness measures, like blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Together with your physician, you can also create action plans for any other conditions, such as knee pain or sleep apnea.

Take Your Vitamins

There is no substitute for a healthy diet, but a healthy diet is not always enough. If you’ve had weight loss surgery, a multivitamin may be part of your daily routine. Talk to your surgeon or doctor about any vitamins you should take and then be sure to take them as recommended to prevent nutritional deficiencies. Remember, staying nourished can also help you lose weight by keeping up your energy levels and metabolism.

Smile

And finally, make it a goal to smile more. Smile when you greet people. Smile when you say goodbye. Smile when you are talking and listening. Smile for no reason at all. Why? Because the very act of smiling can help convince your mind that you are happier. Plus, smiling at other people will make them more likely to be friendly to you, which in turn will make you happier. All that extra happiness can make it easier to do your daily duties, like eating right and working out!


Jessica Gies

Jessica is a registered dietitian with KentuckyOne Health Weight Loss & Surgery Associates.

Learn More About Irregular Heartbeat [Infographic]

Learn More About Irregular Heartbeat [Inforgraphic]

Learn More About Irregular Heartbeat [Inforgraphic]

Heart arrhythmias occur when there is a change to the normal sequence of electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats. This can result in the heart beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which can affect whether blood is being pumped effectively within the body.

Learn more about the symptoms and risk factors of heart arrhythmia below. If you begin experiencing these symptoms, it’s important to seek medical attention immediately.

Colon Cancer Risk Factors and Warning Signs

If you are experiencing an irregular heartbeat or palpitations, schedule an appointment with a health care provider or learn more about available health screenings

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Richard Sutton knew something was wrong roughly four years ago after going to the hospital a third time for an acute attack of pancreatitis.

In total, he had four attacks within eight months. After the third attack, his doctor told him it was chronic pancreatitis.

Richard had been battling stomach problems his entire life, but with pancreatitis, the pain was excruciating. He could feel the pain in the upper left quadrant of his stomach and his upper left back. It was severe pain that immobilized him to the point that he couldn’t move and was doubled over. He would vomit anytime he tried to drink liquids.

His physician tried to place a stent in the pancreatic duct to relieve symptoms, but there was twisting in Richard’s pancreas and the bile wouldn’t drain. The stent only stayed in four-to-six weeks the first time and didn’t work. In February 2017, the doctor tried a second time, but his pancreas had so much calcification on it, the stent again wouldn’t work.

At this point, Richard was referred to the Pancreas Disease Center at Jewish Hospital and met Medical Director, Dr. Michael Hughes for help. That’s where he learned about total pancreatectomy with islet auto-transplantation procedure. During the summer of 2017, he received news he’d receive the surgery, where his pancreas would be removed and the insulin-producing islet cells would be isolated in a cleanroom facility, and then infused into his liver, helping reduce the severity of diabetes after removal of the pancreas.

While Richard is now a diabetic, he already had prediabetes before the surgery and was told in advance of the condition. It was also explained to him that without the procedure, he’d have to have his pancreas completely removed within two to three years.

After his September 2017 surgery, Richard recovered in the hospital for about a week, and was able to get back to his landscaping business in around four to five weeks. He didn’t have any complications, and the chronic pain from the pancreas was gone, although he still experienced some phantom pain from time to time. While he still has some pain from surgery, that is expected to be gone a year after surgery.

Richard is extremely thankful and has zero regrets about having this Auto Islet procedure. He calls it life-changing, and says it has improved the quality of his life drastically. As a 35-year old man with a wife and two children (ages 14 and 12), he is thankful to be leading a normal life again with his family.

The Pancreas Disease Center is part of Jewish Hospital Transplant Care. If you would like to learn more about organ donation, join us on Thursday, April 26 at the Kentucky Derby Festival Health Fair at 4th Street Live from 4 to 8 p.m. During the event, we’ll be providing information about organ donation, the Trager Transplant Center and ways you can help make a difference. 

Appalachian Regional Healthcare and KentuckyOne Reach Definitive Agreement

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Appalachian Regional Healthcare and KentuckyOne reach definitive agreement for purchase of Saint Joseph Martin hospital and clinics

April 17, Lexington, Ky. – Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) and KentuckyOne Health announced today that a definitive agreement has been signed for the purchase of Saint Joseph Martin and its four rural health clinics in Floyd County.

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Jewish Hospital Shelbyville to Host 13th Annual Women’s Wellness Affair

Shelbyville, Ky. (April 16, 2018) – Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host the 13th Annual Women’s Wellness Affair on Monday, April 23, benefiting the hospital’s teen volunteer scholarships, administered through the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation.

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Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital Celebrates Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month With Free Screenings

Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital and the Parkinson Support Center of Kentuckiana will host a reception on Thursday, April 26, 2018 to help educate individuals, their families and caregivers about Parkinson’s disease and the types of services available to them.

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Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East Hosts 19th Annual Maternity Fair

Lexington, Ky. (April 9, 2018) – The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host its 19th annual Maternity Fair on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

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Five Bariatric Surgery Myths and Realities

Five Bariatric Surgery Myths and Realities

If you’re struggling with your weight and related conditions, it’s likely that you’ve tried just about everything. While bariatric surgery is not a quick fix, it can be part of a plan to help you achieve significant weight loss and start living a healthier life.

As you explore your options, including weight loss surgery, it’s important to keep track of any questions you may have. That way, once you meet with your provider or bariatric surgeon you can be sure to have this list as a reference to discuss any information or concerns you have before making a decision.

There is an abundance of information out there regarding bariatric surgery, including some misconceptions. We’ve put together a list of some of the more common myths about bariatric surgery and what you can really expect below.

Myth 1: Weight loss surgery prevents you from regaining weight.

Not true. Most patients are successful in maintaining their weight loss one to two years after their surgery, however, it is possible to regain the weight you’ve lost. Weight loss surgery works in conjunction with healthy lifestyle changes. Your provider will discuss the necessary lifestyle changes you may need to make following your surgery.

Myth 2: Weight loss surgery is a cop-out.

Also not true. Most people undergoing bariatric surgery have tried every diet and pill out there. And while diet and exercise will benefit someone who is severely obese, it may just not be enough for others. Undergoing a weight loss procedure is a tool to help you lose weight. In order to lose weight and keep it off, dietary changes and regular exercise regimens will need to become part of your lifestyle.

Myth 3: After surgery, I won’t need to change my lifestyle.

Weight loss surgery is not a cure for obesity. If you do not change your lifestyle and return to old habits, you will regain weight and experience a relapse in your obesity-related condition. You don’t have to become a marathon runner who adapts a vegan lifestyle, however, your provider will work with you to determine any dietary restrictions and exercise needed to maintain success.

Myth 4: The surgery guarantees weight loss after recovery.

Nothing in life is guaranteed. Within the first few months following weight loss surgery, it is common to see more pounds dropping each month. After those initial few months, it becomes a slower weight loss, which is normal. Keep in mind that weight loss will depend on your ability to make the best choices possible and live a healthier lifestyle.

Myth 5: You do not have to go for follow-up care.

The first few weeks after weight loss surgery are crucial, and you need to be diligent about making it to your follow-up appointments. These appointments allow your health care provider to monitor your healing and advance your diet safely. A year after surgery, follow-ups depend on how you’re doing, but checking in with your provider helps ensure that your progress is monitored and any issues or questions you have can be addressed.

If you are interested in learning more about bariatric surgery, join us for a free informational seminar. A board-certified surgeon will explore a full range of weight loss surgery solutions, and answer any questions to help you make the right decision for your life. Call 502.513.6026 or fill out the quick online form to register for an upcoming seminar near you.

Double Lung Transplant Patient Shares Story of Hope

Double Lung Transplant Gives Patient a Brighter Future

Double Lung Transplant Gives Patient a Brighter Future

Zack Barnum has never known life without cystic fibrosis. Diagnosed with the disease only seven days after his birth, the early prognosis was not good.

Zack Barnum“When I was born, the average life expectancy was maybe living to be a teenager,” said Zack. “As I’ve gotten older and more medical breakthroughs have happened, the average life expectancy is now in the 30s to 40s for someone with cystic fibrosis.”

Those medical breakthroughs enabled Zack to get through life. What he called “occasional tune-ups” consisted of hospital stays for something as simple as a cold.  Zack soldiered on though, knowing that someday his life could be saved by a double lung transplant.

“I joked to myself and to my family that I wanted to make it to age 40, and then things could fall apart,” said Zack. “Though it wasn’t the intent; it sort of happened just that way – I probably should’ve picked a different number.”

At age 40, the infections Zack used to fight off suddenly got more serious. His lung function decreased to 15 percent, and without a double lung transplant; he was given only six months to live.

With only two-and-a-half months of life expectancy left, Zack received his transplant. Even though several complications led to an extended hospital stay, Zack was amazed at the changes that had taken place once leaving the hospital.

“I came out of the hospital after being there for five-and-a-half weeks, and everything had bloomed,” said Zack. When I went to the hospital, trees were barren; when I came out, everything was in full bloom. That was so impactful to me – you spend this time in the hospital and the world around you changes.”

Even though there were dramatic changes in nature and in the world around him in those few weeks, Zack’s recovery would take time.

“Walking home, getting up three steps was difficult,” said Zack. “That’s even after doing physical therapy in the hospital and trying to move around. I pretty much came in the door and collapsed on the couch. For the next month, it was moving from the couch to the bed with my wife and kids trying to help take care of me.”

Slowly but surely, Zack recovered. There was no more need for oxygen. His lung function skyrocketed to 90 percent, and he was able to start enjoying things in life, like bike-riding. A future that at one point could only be measured in weeks, now seemed much brighter.

“I hope that the future holds for me that I get to see my kids graduate from high school – that would be wonderful, said Zack. “I would love to see my kids get married someday and to have that first dance with them; I think that’s what all dads think of when they have daughters.”

Five years prior to his surgery, Zack moved from Indianapolis to Louisville. He knew that when the day came for his lung transplant surgery, he wanted to be close to both his family and Jewish Hospital.

As a national leader in organ transplantation, Jewish Hospital has performed more than 5,000 transplants over more than three decades.

“I’ve been given an opportunity to be alive again,” said Zack. “I want to share that same chance with others, and help raise funds for Jewish Hospital, for organ donation and for cystic fibrosis research and treatment. It’s critical to give other people the same opportunity that I have been given.”

April is National Donate Life Month. If you would like to learn more about organ donation, join us on Thursday, April 26 at the Kentucky Derby Festival Health Fair at 4th Street Live from 4 to 8 p.m. During the event, we’ll be providing information about organ donation, the Trager Transplant Center and ways you can help make a difference. 

How to Ease Pain Caused by Varicose Veins

How to Ease Pain Caused by Varicose Veins

If you have varicose veins, you’re not alone. According to the American Society for Vascular Surgery, more than 20 million Americans are affected by raised and enlarged veins, which most often occur in the legs or feet.

Our veins have tiny valves that work to circulate our blood, carrying it from the rest of our body to our heart. When these one-way valves quit working or are weakened, blood doesn’t flow as it should and pressure beings to build from the blood collecting in the legs.

For some, the resulting varicose veins may only be a cosmetic concern, but for others they could indicate a more serious problem and require treatment. It’s important to speak with your doctor about any concerns that you have regarding varicose veins. Your doctor can check for common symptoms, like swelling, sores, skin discoloration or tenderness, to make a diagnosis and discuss a treatment plan, if necessary.

If you are experiencing large bulging veins, there are some simple lifestyle changes you can try to minimize discomfort. Here are four at-home therapies that may help ease pain associated with varicose veins or prevent them from getting worse.

  1. Exercise

Exercise has a number of health benefits, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that getting your blood pumping can be good for your vein health too. Low-impact exercises that get you moving but don’t put additional stress on your veins can help minimize symptoms by promoting blood flow.

Walking and bicycling can be great options to help relieve pain and discomfort from swollen veins. You should consult your doctor before starting a new workout routine. Some exercises can be counterproductive to vein health and your health care provider can help determine what’s safe and effective for you.

  1. Compression Stockings

Your doctor may recommend compression stockings – a special type of hosiery that applies pressure to your lower legs. Wearing compression stockings compresses the surface veins in your legs, which encourages circulation and blood flow from the legs and feet to the heart. Compression stockings vary in strength, size, brand and type and can be purchased online or at a pharmacy.

  1. Elevating Your Legs

Our veins are having to work against gravity – pumping blood back up from our legs to our heart. Elevating your legs, however, works with gravity to help encourage blood flow and alleviate pressure. Less pressure can mean less pain and much needed rest for your veins and body.

  1. Over-the-counter Medication

Over-the-counter medication might be recommended to manage discomfort. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin or ibuprofen may help. But if you notice any issues with your varicose veins or symptoms become too painful, treatment may be needed. Varicose vein treatments can include laser surgery, sclerotherapy and catheter-assisted procedures.

If you are experiencing pain from varicose veins, speak with your health care provider. Your health care provider can provide additional information on available options and determine if treatment may be necessary. Making a few lifestyle adjustments, like adding low-intensity exercise to your day and remembering to elevate your feet, can be conservative approaches to easing varicose vein pain.

Your primary care provider can help diagnose and manage a wide range of health issues, and refer you to a specialist when needed. Don’t wait to speak with your provider if you have any questions or concerns. If you need a primary care provider, find one near you today.

Hand Safety Tips while Working on the Lawn or Garden

Hand Safety Tips while Working in the Lawn and Garden

Hand Safety Tips while Working on the Lawn or Garden

Warm weather and longer days bring many people outside for fun in the sun, including tending to their lawns and gardens.

Participating in these activities brings an increased chance for serious hand and upper extremity injuries, especially when using lawn mowers and other garden tools.

Special precautions should be taken when gardening and working on the lawn to prevent injury. We’ve gathered a few recommended safety tips to keep in mind while working on the yard.

Lawn Mowing Safety

  • Keep all children away from the area being mowed. The safest place is inside.
  • Make sure there are no sticks, stones or other objects that could get in the path of mowing.
  • Reach under the mower only when it has been turned off and the blade has completely stopped.
  • Refuel the mower only when it has cooled completely.
  • Do not give children rides on lawn mowers.
  • Wear tight fitting clothing so it does not get caught in machinery.
  • Store garden tools in their proper place when they’re not in use.
  • Always wear sturdy, close-toed shoes.
  • Never alter safety mechanisms on tools and mowers.

Gardening Safety

  • Avoid the sun’s rays with a light, long-sleeved shirt, long pants and a hat.
  • Wear gloves that are pliable with no restriction of movement and padded to avoid the development of calluses.
  • Keep tools clean and sharp.
  • Use ergonomic tools with grips that fit your hand.
  • Provide proper storage of tools to prevent rust or from tripping over them.
  • Use a wrist splint if signs of wrist tendinitis develop.
  • Poison ivy or poison oak plants should be avoided. Exposure to poisonous plants should be immediately followed with washing hands and effected area.
  • Remove splinters or thorns by washing the infected area, removing the object with a magnifying glass and pointed forceps and treating the area with hydrogen peroxide.
  • Scrub and trim torn fingernails; apply an antibiotic ointment if necessary.

To learn more about the Jewish Hospital Hand Care Center, contact 502.540.3727.