1.4 Million Americans Experience Traumatic Brain Injury Each Year

Brain Injury Awareness Month

Studies show that 1.4 million Americans will experience a traumatic brain injury (TBI) this year, leading to 275,000 hospitalizations and 52,000 deaths each year in the United States alone. These injuries may be mild to serious, and can lead to permanent mental damage and even death.

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, and Frazier Rehab Institute is working to increase awareness across the Commonwealth of the signs and symptoms of a brain injury.

“Traumatic brain injuries result from a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain,” said Darryl Kaelin, MD, Frazier Rehab Institute Medical Director, and Physical Medical and Rehabilitation Division Chief at University of Louisville Physicians. “They have become increasingly common in adults and children, so it’s important to understand how to determine if a person is at risk for, or suffering from, a head injury.”

There are many causes of TBI, with falls proving to be the most common. Falls disproportionately affect the youngest and oldest age groups. Other leading causes include an unintentional blunt trauma, like being hit by an object, and motor vehicle accidents.

TBIs are classified as mild, moderate or severe. Victims can display a wide variety of physical, cognitive and sensory symptoms, which can help classify the severity of the injury. About 75 percent of TBIs that occur each year are concussions or other forms of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Concussions can appear right away or days or months after the injury.

Adults or children experiencing a concussion typically display loss of consciousness for seconds to a few minutes, a state of being dazed or confused, headache, nausea or vomiting, drowsiness or difficulty sleeping, dizziness and loss of balance. These victims may also experience blurred vision, ringing in the ears, a bad taste in the mouth or changes in the ability to smell. They can show signs of mood swings, depression or anxious behavior.

Severe to moderate brain injuries include symptoms such as loss of consciousness for several minutes to hours, severe headaches, repeated vomiting, convulsions or seizures, pupil dilation, fluids draining from the nose and eyes, weakness or numbness in fingers and toes and loss of coordination. Victims may display profound confusion, slurred speech, agitation or combativeness, and in extreme cases, they will become comatose.

Individuals with severe TBIs will likely require hospitalization. Severe TBIs can result in coma or amnesia after injury. These injuries can lead to death or lasting brain damage. Approximately 5.3 million Americans live with a TBI-related disability.

“Traumatic brain injuries can affect all aspects of the patient’s life, and the lives of their friends and family,” said Dr. Kaelin. “Disabilities that develop from traumatic brain injuries can inhibit the victim’s ability to drive, complete household tasks, maintain employment and even uphold relationships. Our goal is to provide customized treatment and help restore patients to their fullest potential of independence.”  

If you or someone in your care experiences a blow to the head, it is important to see a doctor right away. Do not wait for traumatic brain injury symptoms to occur.

If you or a loved one has a concussion or think you may, call the Frazier Rehab Brain Injury Program at 502.582.7476.

Jewish Hospital Lung Transplant Recipient Thankful for Gift of Organ Donation During Holiday Season

William Justice

William Justice had worked as a coal miner in Eastern Kentucky for more than 32 years, when black lung disease nearly took his life.

Justice had never been a smoker. He suffered from coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP), also known as black lung disease, which is caused by long-term exposure to coal dust, common among coal miners. Justice spent months very ill, in-and-out of the hospital with lung problems.

“My lungs were so bad that even little things would get me down,” said Justice. “The doctors told me that I didn’t have much time left.”

Finally, his doctors recommended that Justice visit Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky for an evaluation. At that time, he began pre-testing for a lung transplant. His heart was strong, but his doctors asked that he meet correct body mass index (BMI) and weight requirements before he would be eligible for a transplant. Justice worked hard to meet the requirements. On Valentine’s Day in 2017, he was placed on the list to receive a lung transplant.

“I knew that a transplant was risky, but I felt like it was my only hope,” said Justice. “The doctors were confident that they could save my life, if an organ donation became available.”

Justice continued treatment while he waited for a lifesaving organ donation. He traveled to Louisville for a visit at the Jewish Hospital Trager Transplant Center on November 20, 2017. He thought never expected it would be more than a check-up.

“That day, one of the coordinators came and found me, and she was crying,” he said. “She told me, ‘we found you a set of new lungs, and you’re receiving a transplant.”

Justice underwent a lung transplant on November 22, 2017. It was a 10-hour procedure, and he spent around six-weeks recovering in the hospital. He was released on January 3, 2018, ready to slowly ease into his new, healthy life.

This Thanksgiving, Justice says he is most thankful for his organ donor and the donor’s family. He has never met his donor’s family, but he wants them to know how thankful he is for the gift of life. Although his medications prevent him from doing so, he wishes that he could register as an organ donor himself and help others in need, just as he received a lifesaving organ donation.

“There are good people out there who make this possible,” he said. “I understand that with the good, comes the bad. A family lost their loved one for me to continue my life. For that, I am beyond grateful. I hope my story is eye-opening, and encourages others to register as donors.”

Justice still attends pulmonary rehabilitation three times per week in his hometown of Phyllis, Kentucky. He recently spoke to a Donate Life group in his area about the importance of organ donation.

Back to School Bash, Antimicrobial Stewardship Center of Excellence Distinction and More News

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health Pediatric Associates Hosts 3rd Annual Back to School Bash for Families

London, Ky. (July 2, 2018) — It’s time to celebrate! School is almost back in session, and KentuckyOne Health Pediatric Associates, a department of Saint Joseph London, wants to help you kick off the school year with its 3rd Annual Back to School Bash.

Read the full article

Saint Joseph Hospital Receives Distinction as IDSA Antimicrobial Stewardship Center of Excellence

Lexington, Ky. (July 2, 2018) – Saint Joseph Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, has been named an Antimicrobial Stewardship Center of Excellence by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

Read the full article

Sun Protection Vital to Minimizing Skin Cancer Risk

Lexington, Ky. (July 2, 2018) – Summer is here and KentuckyOne Health is encouraging Kentuckians to take action and protect themselves and their families from skin cancer, which is often a result of sun damage.

Read the full article

 

Annual Golf Tournament, Safe and Healthy Summer Weight Loss and More News

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Saint Joseph Mount Sterling Foundation Hosts 17th Annual Golf Tournament

The Saint Joseph Mount Sterling Foundation is proud to present the 17th Annual Golf Tournament on Thursday, June 21, 2018 at the Indian Creek Golf Course.

Read the full article

Dr. Joseph Silvers Joins KentuckyOne Health Primary Care Associates in London

London, Ky. (June 4, 2018) – Joseph Silvers, DO, has joined KentuckyOne Health Primary Care Associates, located at 148 London Mountain View Drive, Suite 4 in London.

Read the full article

More Than Half of Kentuckians Classified as Overweight and At Risk for Chronic Illness

Louisville, Ky. (June 4, 2018) – Kentucky has the seventh highest obesity rate in the nation, with 66 percent of Kentuckians classified as overweight and 34 percent considered obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Read the full article

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Stroke [Infographic]

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Stroke [Infographic]

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Stroke [Infographic]

Do you know the warning signs of stroke?

Each year, more than 800,000 people in the United States experience a stroke. It’s important to recognize the symptoms of stroke early. If administered within the first three hours of symptom onset, FDA-approved clot buster drugs have shown to reduce long-term disability in many stroke patients.

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of a stroke:

  • Facial Drooping — Ask the individual to smile. Is one side of his or her face drooping downward?
  • Arms — Next, ask him or her to raise both arms and note whether one drifts downward.
  • Slurred or Strange Speech — Finally, ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Is it correct? Is his or her speech difficult to understand?
  • Time — If someone has these symptoms, call 911 immediately. Don’t put off medical attention, even if the symptoms disappear.

Approximately 80 percent of strokes are preventable, and making lifestyle  changes can help lower a person’s chances of having a stroke, including exercising regularly, quitting smoking, eating healthier, managing cholesterol and blood pressure, and managing atrial fibrillation.

View the infographic below to learn more about the signs and symptoms of stroke.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

If you would like more information on stroke, risk factors or treatment, schedule an appointment with a health care provider or learn more at KentuckyOne Health Stroke Care.

KentuckyOne Health hosts upcoming health fairs

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Jewish Hospital Shelbyville Hosts 18th Annual Men’s Health Fair on June 2

Shelbyville, Ky. (May 11, 2018) – Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, part of KentuckyOne Health, will hold its 18th annual Men’s Health Fair on Saturday, June 2, 2018.

Read full article

Saint Joseph London Hosts 17th Annual Maternity Fair

London, Ky. (May 17, 2018) — Saint Joseph London, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host its 17th annual Maternity Fair on Friday, June 1 from 5:30-8:30 p.m.

Read full article

 

Learn More About Irregular Heartbeat [Infographic]

Learn More About Irregular Heartbeat [Inforgraphic]

Learn More About Irregular Heartbeat [Inforgraphic]

Heart arrhythmias occur when there is a change to the normal sequence of electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats. This can result in the heart beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which can affect whether blood is being pumped effectively within the body.

Learn more about the symptoms and risk factors of heart arrhythmia below. If you begin experiencing these symptoms, it’s important to seek medical attention immediately.

Colon Cancer Risk Factors and Warning Signs

If you are experiencing an irregular heartbeat or palpitations, schedule an appointment with a health care provider or learn more about available health screenings

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Richard Sutton knew something was wrong roughly four years ago after going to the hospital a third time for an acute attack of pancreatitis.

In total, he had four attacks within eight months. After the third attack, his doctor told him it was chronic pancreatitis.

Richard had been battling stomach problems his entire life, but with pancreatitis, the pain was excruciating. He could feel the pain in the upper left quadrant of his stomach and his upper left back. It was severe pain that immobilized him to the point that he couldn’t move and was doubled over. He would vomit anytime he tried to drink liquids.

His physician tried to place a stent in the pancreatic duct to relieve symptoms, but there was twisting in Richard’s pancreas and the bile wouldn’t drain. The stent only stayed in four-to-six weeks the first time and didn’t work. In February 2017, the doctor tried a second time, but his pancreas had so much calcification on it, the stent again wouldn’t work.

At this point, Richard was referred to the Pancreas Disease Center at Jewish Hospital and met Medical Director, Dr. Michael Hughes for help. That’s where he learned about total pancreatectomy with islet auto-transplantation procedure. During the summer of 2017, he received news he’d receive the surgery, where his pancreas would be removed and the insulin-producing islet cells would be isolated in a cleanroom facility, and then infused into his liver, helping reduce the severity of diabetes after removal of the pancreas.

While Richard is now a diabetic, he already had prediabetes before the surgery and was told in advance of the condition. It was also explained to him that without the procedure, he’d have to have his pancreas completely removed within two to three years.

After his September 2017 surgery, Richard recovered in the hospital for about a week, and was able to get back to his landscaping business in around four to five weeks. He didn’t have any complications, and the chronic pain from the pancreas was gone, although he still experienced some phantom pain from time to time. While he still has some pain from surgery, that is expected to be gone a year after surgery.

Richard is extremely thankful and has zero regrets about having this Auto Islet procedure. He calls it life-changing, and says it has improved the quality of his life drastically. As a 35-year old man with a wife and two children (ages 14 and 12), he is thankful to be leading a normal life again with his family.

The Pancreas Disease Center is part of Jewish Hospital Transplant Care. If you would like to learn more about organ donation, join us on Thursday, April 26 at the Kentucky Derby Festival Health Fair at 4th Street Live from 4 to 8 p.m. During the event, we’ll be providing information about organ donation, the Trager Transplant Center and ways you can help make a difference. 

Appalachian Regional Healthcare and KentuckyOne Reach Definitive Agreement

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Appalachian Regional Healthcare and KentuckyOne reach definitive agreement for purchase of Saint Joseph Martin hospital and clinics

April 17, Lexington, Ky. – Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) and KentuckyOne Health announced today that a definitive agreement has been signed for the purchase of Saint Joseph Martin and its four rural health clinics in Floyd County.

Read the full article

Jewish Hospital Shelbyville to Host 13th Annual Women’s Wellness Affair

Shelbyville, Ky. (April 16, 2018) – Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host the 13th Annual Women’s Wellness Affair on Monday, April 23, benefiting the hospital’s teen volunteer scholarships, administered through the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation.

Read the full article

Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital Celebrates Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month With Free Screenings

Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital and the Parkinson Support Center of Kentuckiana will host a reception on Thursday, April 26, 2018 to help educate individuals, their families and caregivers about Parkinson’s disease and the types of services available to them.

Read the full article

Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East Hosts 19th Annual Maternity Fair

Lexington, Ky. (April 9, 2018) – The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host its 19th annual Maternity Fair on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Read the full article

Double Lung Transplant Patient Shares Story of Hope

Double Lung Transplant Gives Patient a Brighter Future

Double Lung Transplant Gives Patient a Brighter Future

Zack Barnum has never known life without cystic fibrosis. Diagnosed with the disease only seven days after his birth, the early prognosis was not good.

Zack Barnum“When I was born, the average life expectancy was maybe living to be a teenager,” said Zack. “As I’ve gotten older and more medical breakthroughs have happened, the average life expectancy is now in the 30s to 40s for someone with cystic fibrosis.”

Those medical breakthroughs enabled Zack to get through life. What he called “occasional tune-ups” consisted of hospital stays for something as simple as a cold.  Zack soldiered on though, knowing that someday his life could be saved by a double lung transplant.

“I joked to myself and to my family that I wanted to make it to age 40, and then things could fall apart,” said Zack. “Though it wasn’t the intent; it sort of happened just that way – I probably should’ve picked a different number.”

At age 40, the infections Zack used to fight off suddenly got more serious. His lung function decreased to 15 percent, and without a double lung transplant; he was given only six months to live.

With only two-and-a-half months of life expectancy left, Zack received his transplant. Even though several complications led to an extended hospital stay, Zack was amazed at the changes that had taken place once leaving the hospital.

“I came out of the hospital after being there for five-and-a-half weeks, and everything had bloomed,” said Zack. When I went to the hospital, trees were barren; when I came out, everything was in full bloom. That was so impactful to me – you spend this time in the hospital and the world around you changes.”

Even though there were dramatic changes in nature and in the world around him in those few weeks, Zack’s recovery would take time.

“Walking home, getting up three steps was difficult,” said Zack. “That’s even after doing physical therapy in the hospital and trying to move around. I pretty much came in the door and collapsed on the couch. For the next month, it was moving from the couch to the bed with my wife and kids trying to help take care of me.”

Slowly but surely, Zack recovered. There was no more need for oxygen. His lung function skyrocketed to 90 percent, and he was able to start enjoying things in life, like bike-riding. A future that at one point could only be measured in weeks, now seemed much brighter.

“I hope that the future holds for me that I get to see my kids graduate from high school – that would be wonderful, said Zack. “I would love to see my kids get married someday and to have that first dance with them; I think that’s what all dads think of when they have daughters.”

Five years prior to his surgery, Zack moved from Indianapolis to Louisville. He knew that when the day came for his lung transplant surgery, he wanted to be close to both his family and Jewish Hospital.

As a national leader in organ transplantation, Jewish Hospital has performed more than 5,000 transplants over more than three decades.

“I’ve been given an opportunity to be alive again,” said Zack. “I want to share that same chance with others, and help raise funds for Jewish Hospital, for organ donation and for cystic fibrosis research and treatment. It’s critical to give other people the same opportunity that I have been given.”

April is National Donate Life Month. If you would like to learn more about organ donation, join us on Thursday, April 26 at the Kentucky Derby Festival Health Fair at 4th Street Live from 4 to 8 p.m. During the event, we’ll be providing information about organ donation, the Trager Transplant Center and ways you can help make a difference.