Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Life-changing Procedure for Chronic Pancreatitis

Richard Sutton knew something was wrong roughly four years ago after going to the hospital a third time for an acute attack of pancreatitis.

In total, he had four attacks within eight months. After the third attack, his doctor told him it was chronic pancreatitis.

Richard had been battling stomach problems his entire life, but with pancreatitis, the pain was excruciating. He could feel the pain in the upper left quadrant of his stomach and his upper left back. It was severe pain that immobilized him to the point that he couldn’t move and was doubled over. He would vomit anytime he tried to drink liquids.

His physician tried to place a stent in the pancreatic duct to relieve symptoms, but there was twisting in Richard’s pancreas and the bile wouldn’t drain. The stent only stayed in four-to-six weeks the first time and didn’t work. In February 2017, the doctor tried a second time, but his pancreas had so much calcification on it, the stent again wouldn’t work.

At this point, Richard was referred to the Pancreas Disease Center at Jewish Hospital and met Medical Director, Dr. Michael Hughes for help. That’s where he learned about total pancreatectomy with islet auto-transplantation procedure. During the summer of 2017, he received news he’d receive the surgery, where his pancreas would be removed and the insulin-producing islet cells would be isolated in a cleanroom facility, and then infused into his liver, helping reduce the severity of diabetes after removal of the pancreas.

While Richard is now a diabetic, he already had prediabetes before the surgery and was told in advance of the condition. It was also explained to him that without the procedure, he’d have to have his pancreas completely removed within two to three years.

After his September 2017 surgery, Richard recovered in the hospital for about a week, and was able to get back to his landscaping business in around four to five weeks. He didn’t have any complications, and the chronic pain from the pancreas was gone, although he still experienced some phantom pain from time to time. While he still has some pain from surgery, that is expected to be gone a year after surgery.

Richard is extremely thankful and has zero regrets about having this Auto Islet procedure. He calls it life-changing, and says it has improved the quality of his life drastically. As a 35-year old man with a wife and two children (ages 14 and 12), he is thankful to be leading a normal life again with his family.

The Pancreas Disease Center is part of Jewish Hospital Transplant Care. If you would like to learn more about organ donation, join us on Thursday, April 26 at the Kentucky Derby Festival Health Fair at 4th Street Live from 4 to 8 p.m. During the event, we’ll be providing information about organ donation, the Trager Transplant Center and ways you can help make a difference. 

Appalachian Regional Healthcare and KentuckyOne Reach Definitive Agreement

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Appalachian Regional Healthcare and KentuckyOne reach definitive agreement for purchase of Saint Joseph Martin hospital and clinics

April 17, Lexington, Ky. – Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) and KentuckyOne Health announced today that a definitive agreement has been signed for the purchase of Saint Joseph Martin and its four rural health clinics in Floyd County.

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Jewish Hospital Shelbyville to Host 13th Annual Women’s Wellness Affair

Shelbyville, Ky. (April 16, 2018) – Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host the 13th Annual Women’s Wellness Affair on Monday, April 23, benefiting the hospital’s teen volunteer scholarships, administered through the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation.

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Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital Celebrates Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month With Free Screenings

Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital and the Parkinson Support Center of Kentuckiana will host a reception on Thursday, April 26, 2018 to help educate individuals, their families and caregivers about Parkinson’s disease and the types of services available to them.

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Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East Hosts 19th Annual Maternity Fair

Lexington, Ky. (April 9, 2018) – The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host its 19th annual Maternity Fair on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

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Double Lung Transplant Patient Shares Story of Hope

Double Lung Transplant Gives Patient a Brighter Future

Double Lung Transplant Gives Patient a Brighter Future

Zack Barnum has never known life without cystic fibrosis. Diagnosed with the disease only seven days after his birth, the early prognosis was not good.

Zack Barnum“When I was born, the average life expectancy was maybe living to be a teenager,” said Zack. “As I’ve gotten older and more medical breakthroughs have happened, the average life expectancy is now in the 30s to 40s for someone with cystic fibrosis.”

Those medical breakthroughs enabled Zack to get through life. What he called “occasional tune-ups” consisted of hospital stays for something as simple as a cold.  Zack soldiered on though, knowing that someday his life could be saved by a double lung transplant.

“I joked to myself and to my family that I wanted to make it to age 40, and then things could fall apart,” said Zack. “Though it wasn’t the intent; it sort of happened just that way – I probably should’ve picked a different number.”

At age 40, the infections Zack used to fight off suddenly got more serious. His lung function decreased to 15 percent, and without a double lung transplant; he was given only six months to live.

With only two-and-a-half months of life expectancy left, Zack received his transplant. Even though several complications led to an extended hospital stay, Zack was amazed at the changes that had taken place once leaving the hospital.

“I came out of the hospital after being there for five-and-a-half weeks, and everything had bloomed,” said Zack. When I went to the hospital, trees were barren; when I came out, everything was in full bloom. That was so impactful to me – you spend this time in the hospital and the world around you changes.”

Even though there were dramatic changes in nature and in the world around him in those few weeks, Zack’s recovery would take time.

“Walking home, getting up three steps was difficult,” said Zack. “That’s even after doing physical therapy in the hospital and trying to move around. I pretty much came in the door and collapsed on the couch. For the next month, it was moving from the couch to the bed with my wife and kids trying to help take care of me.”

Slowly but surely, Zack recovered. There was no more need for oxygen. His lung function skyrocketed to 90 percent, and he was able to start enjoying things in life, like bike-riding. A future that at one point could only be measured in weeks, now seemed much brighter.

“I hope that the future holds for me that I get to see my kids graduate from high school – that would be wonderful, said Zack. “I would love to see my kids get married someday and to have that first dance with them; I think that’s what all dads think of when they have daughters.”

Five years prior to his surgery, Zack moved from Indianapolis to Louisville. He knew that when the day came for his lung transplant surgery, he wanted to be close to both his family and Jewish Hospital.

As a national leader in organ transplantation, Jewish Hospital has performed more than 5,000 transplants over more than three decades.

“I’ve been given an opportunity to be alive again,” said Zack. “I want to share that same chance with others, and help raise funds for Jewish Hospital, for organ donation and for cystic fibrosis research and treatment. It’s critical to give other people the same opportunity that I have been given.”

April is National Donate Life Month. If you would like to learn more about organ donation, join us on Thursday, April 26 at the Kentucky Derby Festival Health Fair at 4th Street Live from 4 to 8 p.m. During the event, we’ll be providing information about organ donation, the Trager Transplant Center and ways you can help make a difference. 

How to Ease Pain Caused by Varicose Veins

How to Ease Pain Caused by Varicose Veins

If you have varicose veins, you’re not alone. According to the American Society for Vascular Surgery, more than 20 million Americans are affected by raised and enlarged veins, which most often occur in the legs or feet.

Our veins have tiny valves that work to circulate our blood, carrying it from the rest of our body to our heart. When these one-way valves quit working or are weakened, blood doesn’t flow as it should and pressure beings to build from the blood collecting in the legs.

For some, the resulting varicose veins may only be a cosmetic concern, but for others they could indicate a more serious problem and require treatment. It’s important to speak with your doctor about any concerns that you have regarding varicose veins. Your doctor can check for common symptoms, like swelling, sores, skin discoloration or tenderness, to make a diagnosis and discuss a treatment plan, if necessary.

If you are experiencing large bulging veins, there are some simple lifestyle changes you can try to minimize discomfort. Here are four at-home therapies that may help ease pain associated with varicose veins or prevent them from getting worse.

  1. Exercise

Exercise has a number of health benefits, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that getting your blood pumping can be good for your vein health too. Low-impact exercises that get you moving but don’t put additional stress on your veins can help minimize symptoms by promoting blood flow.

Walking and bicycling can be great options to help relieve pain and discomfort from swollen veins. You should consult your doctor before starting a new workout routine. Some exercises can be counterproductive to vein health and your health care provider can help determine what’s safe and effective for you.

  1. Compression Stockings

Your doctor may recommend compression stockings – a special type of hosiery that applies pressure to your lower legs. Wearing compression stockings compresses the surface veins in your legs, which encourages circulation and blood flow from the legs and feet to the heart. Compression stockings vary in strength, size, brand and type and can be purchased online or at a pharmacy.

  1. Elevating Your Legs

Our veins are having to work against gravity – pumping blood back up from our legs to our heart. Elevating your legs, however, works with gravity to help encourage blood flow and alleviate pressure. Less pressure can mean less pain and much needed rest for your veins and body.

  1. Over-the-counter Medication

Over-the-counter medication might be recommended to manage discomfort. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin or ibuprofen may help. But if you notice any issues with your varicose veins or symptoms become too painful, treatment may be needed. Varicose vein treatments can include laser surgery, sclerotherapy and catheter-assisted procedures.

If you are experiencing pain from varicose veins, speak with your health care provider. Your health care provider can provide additional information on available options and determine if treatment may be necessary. Making a few lifestyle adjustments, like adding low-intensity exercise to your day and remembering to elevate your feet, can be conservative approaches to easing varicose vein pain.

Your primary care provider can help diagnose and manage a wide range of health issues, and refer you to a specialist when needed. Don’t wait to speak with your provider if you have any questions or concerns. If you need a primary care provider, find one near you today.

Hand Safety Tips while Working on the Lawn or Garden

Hand Safety Tips while Working in the Lawn and Garden

Hand Safety Tips while Working on the Lawn or Garden

Warm weather and longer days bring many people outside for fun in the sun, including tending to their lawns and gardens.

Participating in these activities brings an increased chance for serious hand and upper extremity injuries, especially when using lawn mowers and other garden tools.

Special precautions should be taken when gardening and working on the lawn to prevent injury. We’ve gathered a few recommended safety tips to keep in mind while working on the yard.

Lawn Mowing Safety

  • Keep all children away from the area being mowed. The safest place is inside.
  • Make sure there are no sticks, stones or other objects that could get in the path of mowing.
  • Reach under the mower only when it has been turned off and the blade has completely stopped.
  • Refuel the mower only when it has cooled completely.
  • Do not give children rides on lawn mowers.
  • Wear tight fitting clothing so it does not get caught in machinery.
  • Store garden tools in their proper place when they’re not in use.
  • Always wear sturdy, close-toed shoes.
  • Never alter safety mechanisms on tools and mowers.

Gardening Safety

  • Avoid the sun’s rays with a light, long-sleeved shirt, long pants and a hat.
  • Wear gloves that are pliable with no restriction of movement and padded to avoid the development of calluses.
  • Keep tools clean and sharp.
  • Use ergonomic tools with grips that fit your hand.
  • Provide proper storage of tools to prevent rust or from tripping over them.
  • Use a wrist splint if signs of wrist tendinitis develop.
  • Poison ivy or poison oak plants should be avoided. Exposure to poisonous plants should be immediately followed with washing hands and effected area.
  • Remove splinters or thorns by washing the infected area, removing the object with a magnifying glass and pointed forceps and treating the area with hydrogen peroxide.
  • Scrub and trim torn fingernails; apply an antibiotic ointment if necessary.

To learn more about the Jewish Hospital Hand Care Center, contact 502.540.3727.

Our Lady of Peace to Host Free Seminars, Alleviate Spring Allergy Symptoms, and More News

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Our Lady of Peace to Host Free Seminar Focused on Making a Successful Transition to Middle School

Midway, Ky. (April 5, 2018) — Transitioning from elementary school to middle school isn’t an easy task. That’s why Our Lady of Peace, part of KentuckyOne Health, will hold an upcoming free seminar focused on how to make a successful transition to middle school.

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Saint Joseph Hospital Recertified as Advanced Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission

Lexington, Ky. (April 4, 2018) – Saint Joseph Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, announced today that it has again earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Heart-Check mark for Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers.

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Our Lady of Peace to Host Free Seminar to Address How to Speak to Children After a Traumatic Event

Lexington, Ky. (April 3, 2018) — Natural disasters, accidents and violence are topics that we hear of often, but how do they affect children? Traumatic events can sometimes cause fear and anxiety in children, which is why Our Lady of Peace, part of KentuckyOne Health, will hold an upcoming free seminar focused on talking to children after an emotionally disturbing or devastating event.

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Alleviate Spring Allergy Symptoms Through Prevention and Treatment

Louisville, Ky. (April 2, 2018) – Spring has sprung, which means that many Americans are already dealing with seasonal allergy symptoms like sneezing, coughing and watery eyes.

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Saint Joseph London and Community Partners Promoting Child Safety During Child Abuse Awareness Month

London, Ky. (April 2, 2018) – April is Child Abuse Awareness Month, a time when many community organizations across the country work together to help prevent child abuse.

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Colon Cancer Awareness [Infographic]

Colon Cancer Awareness Infographic

Did you know that colorectal cancer is treatable if caught early through screening?

Colorectal cancer refers to a type of gastrointestinal cancer that usually begins as a growth, called a polyp, in either the colon or the rectum. Kentucky has some of the highest rates of colorectal cancer deaths in the country. In 2013, the Commonwealth ranked fourth in the nation for colorectal cancer deaths, according to the Colon Cancer Prevention Project.

Fortunately, through early detection and treatment, the disease is also highly preventable. At least 60 percent of deaths from this cancer could be avoided if those 50 years or older had regular screening test, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Review the infographic below to learn more about risk factors for colon cancer and warning signs.

Colon Cancer Risk Factors and Warning Signs

 

Preventive health screenings are key to detecting diseases before you have symptoms. Speak to your primary care provider to learn more about each type of health screening available.