Jewish Hospital Lung Transplant Recipient Thankful for Gift of Organ Donation During Holiday Season

William Justice

William Justice had worked as a coal miner in Eastern Kentucky for more than 32 years, when black lung disease nearly took his life.

Justice had never been a smoker. He suffered from coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP), also known as black lung disease, which is caused by long-term exposure to coal dust, common among coal miners. Justice spent months very ill, in-and-out of the hospital with lung problems.

“My lungs were so bad that even little things would get me down,” said Justice. “The doctors told me that I didn’t have much time left.”

Finally, his doctors recommended that Justice visit Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky for an evaluation. At that time, he began pre-testing for a lung transplant. His heart was strong, but his doctors asked that he meet correct body mass index (BMI) and weight requirements before he would be eligible for a transplant. Justice worked hard to meet the requirements. On Valentine’s Day in 2017, he was placed on the list to receive a lung transplant.

“I knew that a transplant was risky, but I felt like it was my only hope,” said Justice. “The doctors were confident that they could save my life, if an organ donation became available.”

Justice continued treatment while he waited for a lifesaving organ donation. He traveled to Louisville for a visit at the Jewish Hospital Trager Transplant Center on November 20, 2017. He thought never expected it would be more than a check-up.

“That day, one of the coordinators came and found me, and she was crying,” he said. “She told me, ‘we found you a set of new lungs, and you’re receiving a transplant.”

Justice underwent a lung transplant on November 22, 2017. It was a 10-hour procedure, and he spent around six-weeks recovering in the hospital. He was released on January 3, 2018, ready to slowly ease into his new, healthy life.

This Thanksgiving, Justice says he is most thankful for his organ donor and the donor’s family. He has never met his donor’s family, but he wants them to know how thankful he is for the gift of life. Although his medications prevent him from doing so, he wishes that he could register as an organ donor himself and help others in need, just as he received a lifesaving organ donation.

“There are good people out there who make this possible,” he said. “I understand that with the good, comes the bad. A family lost their loved one for me to continue my life. For that, I am beyond grateful. I hope my story is eye-opening, and encourages others to register as donors.”

Justice still attends pulmonary rehabilitation three times per week in his hometown of Phyllis, Kentucky. He recently spoke to a Donate Life group in his area about the importance of organ donation.

Group – It’s a Good Thing

Cindi Gardner - Rosie Ring

The first time Cindi Gardner walked into the Rosie Ring, she felt comfortable.

“We share. People listen. We get understanding without those sad looks we get from people who haven’t experienced cancer. I don’t feel the stigma of cancer – we all have it or are recovering from it,” she said in a recent testimonial. “It isn’t the dirty word or the elephant in the room no one wants to acknowledge. I don’t have to reveal that I have cancer – that’s why I’m there!”

Cindi Gardner

Rosie Ring is a networking and support group for women facing breast cancer offered through KentuckyOne Health Cancer Care at Saint Joseph East. Since 2013, women in the group have been gathering to discuss everything from the side effects of medicine to coping strategies to quality of life.

“It’s a great combination of incredible women, a social worker who gets it and is open to whatever topic comes up, and a place I can go where I don’t feel like the sick one,” she said in a recent testimonial. “I DON’T FEEL LIKE THE SICK ONE.”

The group meets for different activities that expose them to tools they can use while coping with their diagnosis, treatment and fear of reoccurrence, according to Stacy Florence, MSW, CSW, OSW-C, manager of Business Operations, Oncology Services.

“Group has been where I’ve learned so much – about treatment, recovery, resources, coping strategies, … Oh my! I realize physicians can’t give me a list of every possible side effect, information about alternative treatments, or share personal stories of patients,” Cindi said. “I’m amongst a group of women – intelligent, proactive women – who have educated themselves about self-care and cancer and are willing to share. I can show up at Group and ask, ‘Has anyone????’ and most likely someone has and is willing to talk about it.”

The women do yoga. They take cooking classes. They’ve done a drum circle. They’ve focused on things such as combatting fatigue, physical therapy, eating well, medication management and advance care planning.

“Our activities and outings – from meditation, restorative yoga, dog kennels – are a great combination of fun, distraction, and still with that common bond of cancer<” Cindi said. “If someone needs to take it slow, no one complains. Good news/results, not so good news/results – it’s all OK. Bald heads, compression stockings, lopsided chests – it’s all OK.”

For Cindi, it’s more than the group meetings. She’s made new friends, who often check in with her and they meet regularly for lunch. That includes a special friend “who lets me whine and complain about the side effects of the aromatase inhibitor I am taking. She also deals with the same issues, and we support each other through emails, dinners, and texts. She is a huge support – which shows that Group extends outside of our scheduled gatherings.

“There is just something about the Rosie Ring that is special. I can’t quite put my finger on it and put it succinctly. I just know it works,” she said. “We are a group of women going through treatment and recovering from treatment – living with that shadow of recurrence that no one else quite gets.

“Group – it’s a good thing.”

Learn more about Rosie Ring and other Cancer Care support groups at Saint Joseph East.

Cancer Treatment Close to Home for Bardstown Resident

Twyman Clements

Twyman Clements of Bardstown had just graduated from the University of Kentucky in 2009. He was beginning to plan the next steps in his career when a regular physical for his Type I diabetes changed his world.

At age 22, Twyman was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer which they’d worried had metastasized. Doctors told him that if they hadn’t caught it, he would have been dead before the end of the year.

Immediately, he began treatment at Flaget Memorial Hospital. The cancer center had not yet been built, so he took his chemotherapy inside the main hospital.

“I was thinking I was going to die,” said Twyman, who is now CEO, President and Co-Founder of Space Tango, a Lexington-based company which manufactures high value products in microgravity via the International Space Station.

When you’re wrestling with life and death, Twyman said, you don’t want to have to worry about incremental stresses like traveling away from home.

Having the comfort of being in Bardstown, where his mom knew the nurses and the drive home was 15 minutes at most was a relief, he said.

For more inspiring stories of hope or to learn more about Project Hope and how you can get involved, visit Flaget Memorial Hospital Foundation.

Maggie’s Light

Maggie's Light

Emily and Kevin Turner turned the grief that swept over them as they held their lifeless newborn daughter into a mission to help others facing the devastating loss of a child and to honor the memory of their stillborn daughter, Magdelena (Maggie).

“Maggie changed my mission in life, to help guide others, to help others learn to walk with grief,” Emily said.

The couple started Maggie’s Light, a nonprofit that raises funds for bereavement kits that include comforting books, a handmade blanket, journals and more for families who have lost a child. They recently donated bereavement kits and a cuddle cot for stillborn babies to Saint Joseph East through the Saint Joseph Hospital Foundation. The cuddle cots are valued at $3,000 each.

Debbie Gibbons, RN, a labor and delivery nurse at Saint Joseph East, runs the hospital’s bereavement program, which she started in 1999.

No other Lexington hospital has a bereavement program as extensive as Saint Joseph East, Gibbons said. They offer a prayer service and burial for miscarried babies every other month at Calvary Cemetery. Since the service began in 2015, more than 500 remains have been buried. They also offer palliative care to families who have received a diagnosis that is life limiting to their baby.

“Emily has been able to take that pain, that sadness and really keep moving forward with it,” Gibbons said. “Not everybody is able to do that. It takes a special person.”

Emily said her faith in God helped her through her pain, and she shares that with others who are in similar situations. In addition to Maggie, who would be 5 this year, Emily and her husband have three kids, Vaughn, 16, Morgan, 4, and Isaiah, 3.

“If I have a mom who is struggling a bit, I can connect her to Emily and Emily will be able to talk with her and offer encouragement,” Gibbons said.

Maggie’s Light is now raising money to make more bereavement kits available at every KentuckyOne hospital. She hopes to provide these kits next to the Birthing Center at Saint Joseph London.

Back to School Bash, Antimicrobial Stewardship Center of Excellence Distinction and More News

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health Pediatric Associates Hosts 3rd Annual Back to School Bash for Families

London, Ky. (July 2, 2018) — It’s time to celebrate! School is almost back in session, and KentuckyOne Health Pediatric Associates, a department of Saint Joseph London, wants to help you kick off the school year with its 3rd Annual Back to School Bash.

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Saint Joseph Hospital Receives Distinction as IDSA Antimicrobial Stewardship Center of Excellence

Lexington, Ky. (July 2, 2018) – Saint Joseph Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, has been named an Antimicrobial Stewardship Center of Excellence by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

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Sun Protection Vital to Minimizing Skin Cancer Risk

Lexington, Ky. (July 2, 2018) – Summer is here and KentuckyOne Health is encouraging Kentuckians to take action and protect themselves and their families from skin cancer, which is often a result of sun damage.

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How to dine out successfully when trying to lose weight

How to dine out successfully when trying to lose weight

How to dine out successfully when trying to lose weight

It’s no secret that when you’re trying to lose weight or make healthier food choices, dining out can cause its fair share of temptations. From portion sizes to added ingredients, dessert options and peer pressure, it can be tough to navigate the dining experience and still feel in control.

The journey to healthier eating, however, doesn’t mean you have to forego an evening with friends or miss out on the new restaurant everyone is talking about. Instead, a little bit of planning and understanding common food traps can help you feel satisfied and still on track to reach your goal.

Below are a few tips to help you dine out successfully.

Dining Out Tips

First and foremost, don’t feel pressured to eat like everyone else. Other diners may order larger portions or unhealthy meals – don’t let that deter you or make you feel bad for choosing to eat healthy. Also, consider substituting side dishes. Instead of ordering the customary French fries or mashed potatoes with your meal, ask for a salad or steamed vegetables. Most restaurants offer these substitutions at no (or very little) additional cost.

A salad can be a great option, but sometimes the dressings and other sauces can turn a healthy meal into a not-so-healthy meal. When dining out, ask for these on the side. That way you can control the amount you consume or find a lighter alternative.

It’s also important to know how your food is prepared, and avoid foods that are fried. Choose dishes that are:

  • Grilled
  • Baked
  • Broiled
  • Roasted
  • Steamed
  • Stir-fried
  • Poached

These preparations are typically healthier options; and if the menu isn’t clear, ask your server how the dish is prepared before you order. Some menus also offer a “light” menu section.

Consider that most restaurant portions are two to three times what a serving should be and that many times when we receive a full portion, we’re tempted to clean our plate. One way to help stop that temptation is to order a smaller portion. If that’s not an option, ask for a to-go container at the beginning of the meal and put half of the meal away for later. Out of sight. Out of mind.

Finally, if you want to order an adult beverage, try a glass of red wine as a lower-calorie alternative to heavy beers and mixed drinks.

Conclusion

If you enjoy eating out, don’t let your weight loss goals keep you from enjoying that experience. There are different steps you can take to help you order from the menu with confidence, knowing that you’re still on track! Substituting side dishes, asking for lighter options and assessing portion sizes, are just a few ways you can dine out successfully.


By KentuckyOne Health Weight Loss Surgery

Find more weight loss articles like this one. If you’ve been considering weight loss surgery and would like to learn more about the options available and if it’s right for you, join us for one of our free weight loss surgery seminars.

Eight simple tricks to mindful eating

Eight simple tricks to mindful eating

Eating is such a significant part of our daily lives, yet it’s so easy to get disconnected from it. One moment our plates are full, and the next moment, they’re empty and we’ve hardly tasted or enjoyed one bite.

Practicing mindful eating can bring us awareness of our own actions, thoughts, feelings and motivations, plus insight into the roots of health and contentment. So what is mindful eating and how can we achieve it?

Below we explore what it means to eat more mindfully and steps you can take to help focus on your food.

What is Mindful Eating?

Mindful eating is having awareness of physical and psychological sensations associated with eating, which includes:

  • Allowing yourself to become aware of the positive and nurturing opportunities available through food preparation and eating by respecting your own inner wisdom.
  • Choosing to eat food that is both pleasing to you and nourishing to your body by using all your senses to explore, savor and taste.
  • Learning to be aware of physical hunger and fullness cues to guide your decisions to begin eating and to stop eating.
  • Acknowledging responses to food without judgment – Someone who eats mindfully acknowledges that there is no right or wrong way to eat, but varying degrees of awareness surrounding the experience of food.

Tips to Eat More Mindfully

  1. Chew 25 times: There is reliable scientific data that extra chewing results in less overall food intake.
  2. Feed yourself with your non-dominant hand: Making things more difficult is a great way to force yourself to pay attention to what you’re doing. Start slow by just doing it for breakfast and snacks.
  3. Put your fork down between each bite: This is an excellent complement to the chewing habit. Setting your fork down forces you to focus on chewing your food rather than letting yourself mindlessly pick at your plate for your next bite.
  4. Tune in: Take your first bite with your eyes closed and tune into the sound of the bite and swallowing. This will help you to slow down as you consume your meals.
  5. Try to identify every ingredient in your meal: This is a great way to focus on the present moment.
  6. Put your food on a plate: This may sound obvious, but eating out of a bag is not practicing mindful eating. Get in the habit of placing small snacks on a plate before you eat them. This forces you to acknowledge exactly what and how much you will be eating.
  7. Sit at a table: This formalizes a dining experience, helping you draw attention to your food and eating habits.
  8. Eat in silence: Put away your phone and turn off the TV. Eat distraction free so that you can focus on the taste and smells of your meal.

By KentuckyOne Health Weight Loss & Surgery Associates

Other articles you may be interested in:

Annual Golf Tournament, Safe and Healthy Summer Weight Loss and More News

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

KentuckyOne Health News and Events

Saint Joseph Mount Sterling Foundation Hosts 17th Annual Golf Tournament

The Saint Joseph Mount Sterling Foundation is proud to present the 17th Annual Golf Tournament on Thursday, June 21, 2018 at the Indian Creek Golf Course.

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Dr. Joseph Silvers Joins KentuckyOne Health Primary Care Associates in London

London, Ky. (June 4, 2018) – Joseph Silvers, DO, has joined KentuckyOne Health Primary Care Associates, located at 148 London Mountain View Drive, Suite 4 in London.

Read the full article

More Than Half of Kentuckians Classified as Overweight and At Risk for Chronic Illness

Louisville, Ky. (June 4, 2018) – Kentucky has the seventh highest obesity rate in the nation, with 66 percent of Kentuckians classified as overweight and 34 percent considered obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Read the full article

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Stroke [Infographic]

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Stroke [Infographic]

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Stroke [Infographic]

Do you know the warning signs of stroke?

Each year, more than 800,000 people in the United States experience a stroke. It’s important to recognize the symptoms of stroke early. If administered within the first three hours of symptom onset, FDA-approved clot buster drugs have shown to reduce long-term disability in many stroke patients.

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of a stroke:

  • Facial Drooping — Ask the individual to smile. Is one side of his or her face drooping downward?
  • Arms — Next, ask him or her to raise both arms and note whether one drifts downward.
  • Slurred or Strange Speech — Finally, ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Is it correct? Is his or her speech difficult to understand?
  • Time — If someone has these symptoms, call 911 immediately. Don’t put off medical attention, even if the symptoms disappear.

Approximately 80 percent of strokes are preventable, and making lifestyle  changes can help lower a person’s chances of having a stroke, including exercising regularly, quitting smoking, eating healthier, managing cholesterol and blood pressure, and managing atrial fibrillation.

View the infographic below to learn more about the signs and symptoms of stroke.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

If you would like more information on stroke, risk factors or treatment, schedule an appointment with a health care provider or learn more at KentuckyOne Health Stroke Care.

Low back pain: A physical therapist’s perspective

Low back pain: A physical therapist's perspective

Low back pain: A physical therapist’s perspective

When patients who are suffering from low back pain come to physical therapy for the first time, the two most frequently asked questions are, “Why was I referred to physical therapy when my MRI shows joint or disc abnormalities?” and “Don’t I need an MRI so you know what is going on?”

Both questions are very reasonable. After an MRI reveals a disc bulge or protrusion, many patients feel that a referral to a physical therapist is the equivalent of having your mechanic tell you to continue to drive your car and see if your flat tire improves. Frankly, both scenarios can feel ridiculous.

Thankfully, the human body is not like a car. Multiple studies in the last few years have shown that the farther a disc extrudes or protrudes, the more likely your body is to reabsorb the disc with time.(1,2) In other words, disc healing is a very real and normal occurrence.

MRI and X-ray Abnormalities

As we age, we can develop abnormalities that can be seen on MRI and X-ray. For example, in studies of patients without low back or neck complaints, about 30 percent of patients in their 20’s have disc bulging and degeneration.

The percent of abnormalities increases with age and by the time an individual is in his or her 80’s the prevalence of these abnormalities is greater than 80 percent.(3) Remember, these abnormalities are in patients without pain.

While there are times when surgery is needed to address low back pain, outcomes are significantly improved when abnormalities in imaging correspond with the expected complaints of the patient and positive clinical findings.

Watch the video below to learn more about how physical therapists can often treat lower back pain without surgery.

Low Back Pain Treatment

When developing a treatment plan for low back pain, it is important to realize that a one-size-fits-all approach is not appropriate. In other words, some movements and treatments that help one patient may not be effective for treating your low back pain.

Research has shown that subgrouping patients based on their history and clinical findings improves outcomes.(4) We do this first by getting a good history of the patient’s symptoms, screening for potential red flags, assessing neurologic involvement (how is his or her sensation and strength), and then determining movement or directional preference.

Movement preference is part of a spine examination where you complete range-of-motion exercises in particular planes of movement to determine how these motions affect your pain sensitivity or symptom location. Once movement preference has been determined, evidence-based therapeutic exercise and manual therapy are used to reduce pain sensitivity and restore previous mobility.

After the first visit to physical therapy, you should have a better understanding of what movements or postures are affecting your pain and what you can do immediately to improve symptoms. In each subsequent visit, response to treatment is reassessed and joint mobilizations, manipulation, soft tissue mobilization, and other various manual techniques along with progressive therapeutic exercises are utilized to further decrease pain sensitivity and movement limitation.

While the time it takes for symptoms to resolve varies, most patients should be able to see a benefit in their pain with physical therapy after the first few visits.


Nelson Caudill

Nelson Caudill is a physical therapist with KentuckyOne Health.

  1. Zhong M, Liu JT, Jiang H, et al. Incidence of Spontaneous Resorption of Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Meta-Analysis. Pain Physician. 2017;20(1):E45-E52.
  2. Chiu CC, Chuang TY, Chang KH, Wu CH, Lin PW, Hsu WY. The probability of spontaneous regression of lumbar herniated disc: a systematic review. Clin Rehabil. 2015;29(2):184-95.
  3. Brinjikji W, Luetmer PH, Comstock B, et al. Systematic literature review of imaging features of spinal degeneration in asymptomatic populations. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2015;36:811–6
  4. Fritz JM, Cleland JA, Childs JD. Subgrouping patients with low back pain: evolution of a classification approach to physical therapy. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2007;37(6):290-302.